Be Adventurous but Be
Safety Aware!
F O R C S M S T U D E N T S T R A V E L I N G O V E R S E A S
Office of International Programs
1706 Illinois St
Emergency: (001) 303 619-5762
Public Safety: (001) 303 273-3333
Pay Attention. Be Safe!
Did you know?
Special points of interest:

Before You Go
Students

CDC: WWW.CDC.GOV

Learn something about lo-

IMMUNIZATIONS
Students complete OIP
cal laws and customs
travel forms prior to depar-

HEALTH RISKS
Plan your wardrobe: leave
ture.
expensive looking jewelry

W

WW.STATE.GOV/TRAVEL
at home. Leave sports
Register at

TRAVEL ADVISORIES
team shirts, caps at home.
www.travel.state.gov


REGISTER YOUR TRIP
Take only what you need:
Are your belongings secure?
Get ISIC Card
credit card, ID—they can be

WWW.FBI.GOV

stolen.
Get Travel Advisories

REPORT INCIDENTS
Traveling, studying or at-
Make copies: passport,
and Emergency phone

W
tending a conference in an-
WW.OIP.MINES.EDU
driver’s license, airline tick-
numbers in-country.
other country is an enriching
et, credit cards. Record

experience, particularly if
phone numbers in case
Have a plan.
you are prepared and alert. they are stolen. Leave one
Electronics
This flyer introduces you to
copy home; tuck a second

threats you may face and
copy in the bottom of your
If you don’t need it, don’t
provides tips to avoid unsafe
suitcase.
take it!
situations.
Meds: in original container.

“Be Prepared” - the old Boy
 Avoid Wi-Fi networks
If you would hate to lose it,
Scout creed can reduce your
 Sanitize and backup
leave it home!
risk of encountering prob-
 Use a new email ac-
lems.
count number while
traveling.
 Do not use thumb
Just the facts!
drives given to you.
 Delete history files,
During the Beijing Olympics, hotels were required to install software so law enforcement could
caches, cookies, etc.
monitor Internet usage of guests.
 DO NOT EXPECT
PRIVACY
Cyber criminals buy and sell stolen financial information and login credentials.
Cafes. Hotels
US students studying overseas talked privately about their apartment lighting. The next day
Airplanes, offices
the light was working.

If your laptop, phone or
Theft from the sleeping compartment of trains is common, even though the door was “locked”.
other electronics are sto-
Avoid local civil disturbances; you could be arrested even though you are a bystander.
len, contact the US Em-
bassy or Consulate.
In many countries it is prohibited to speak derogatorily about the government or its leaders.

Be Adventurous but Be Safety Aware!
In Country Tips
►►Avoid ATMs on the Street: your back is toward passing traffic.
►►Protect your passport. If the hotel requests keeping it during your stay, ask for
a receipt. Report loss or theft immediately upon discovery.
►►Do NOT use “gypsy” taxis.
ASSESS THE
►►Do not leave drinks unattended: Not even while going to the Restroom.
RISKS
►►Do not try to keep up with host in social drinking. Know when to say “no” or
how to sip slowly.

HAVE AN
►►Don't use short cuts, narrow alleys or poorly lit streets.
►►On a crowded bus, tram or train, move your backpack to your front; arms
ALTERNATIVE PLAN
through both straps.

►►Learn a few phrases in the local language or have them handy in written form so
BE DISCREET
that you can signal your need for police or medical help.


STAY AWARE
Tell someone where you are going and when you plan to return.

Know where the exits are and have a plan!
KEEP OTHERS
The Station Nightclub Fire in NY in 2003 killed 100 people and injured many more in slightly
INFORMED!
over 5 minutes. People rushed to the front door. Other exits were blocked. The stampede of

people toward the main exit blocked the exit completely.

The Seton Hall Dorm fire of 2000, killed 3 and injured others. There were no sprinklers. The

alarm system was faulty. Hotels and student housing overseas may not have sprinklers or
alarms unless they are fairly new construction.
Students in Australia responding to a survey (2000) on fire awareness reported that they had
fire blankets, extinguishers and sprinklers in their housing; however, over 50% did not know
how to use the equipment and 18% did not know Australia’s emergency number (Source:
http://web.cs.wpi.edu/~rek/Project/AFAC_D09.pdf)

Many foreign destinations have NO fire alert system at all. Be prepared! Know the num-
bers. Have a plan.

Recently evacuated
because of terrorist
threats. Be alert in
International Customs and Medicines
high tourist areas.
To avoid problems when passing through customs, keep medicines in their original, la-
beled containers. Bring copies of your prescriptions and the generic names for the
Keep your cell phone
drugs. If a medication is unusual or contains narcotics, carry a letter from your doctor
charged and enter the
attesting to your need to take the drug. If you have any doubt about the legality of carry-
emergency numbers:
ing a certain drug into a country, consult the embassy or consulate of that country be-
fore you travel.
police, fire, your ad-

dress and the nearest
Be polite and cooperative. Do not bring in or take out illegal drugs, black market prod-
U.S. embassy
ucts, Have a plan for exiting the airport or train station. Appear confident because you
are confident.

Pay Attention. Be Safe!
Register your travel
Register with the State Department as
True Stories
you are getting ready to travel. Acci-
dents and emergencies can happen at
Mines student arrested in Japan when someone sent him marijuana
home and overseas. If you register with
brownies in the mail!
the State Department, they can contact
Mines students raped in Ireland and France!
you whether the emergency is at home or
in the area where you are traveling.
Mines student victim of theft at knifepoint in Italy while backpacking.

Mines student detained in airport in France—looked like Bin Laden!
Travel registration is free and easy.
Passport stolen in Honduras; another left on a bar in Budapest!
Your information is confidential in ac-
Mines student broke jaw on cobblestones in a Delft rainstorm.
cordance with the Privacy Act.

https://
travelregistration.state.gov
Accidents can happen to anyone—even you!
Let Common Sense Prevail
BUS, TRAIN, ON THE
STREET
Safety on the Street
 Don't use short cuts, nar-
 Beware of pickpockets.
row alleys or poorly lit
They often have an accom-
Pickpockets
Use the same common sense
streets.
plice who will:

traveling overseas that you
 Do not discuss travel
 jostle you,
Drunk passengers.
would at home. Be especially
plans or other personal
 ask you for directions or

cautious in (or avoid) areas
matters with strangers.
the time,
Squeeze play.
where you may be more eas-
 Avoid scam artists by


point to something
ily victimized. These include
being wary of strangers
Watch out for cyclists.
spilled on your clothing,
crowded subways, train sta-
who approach you and

 or distract you by creat-
tions, elevators, tourist sites,
offer to be your guide or
USE ATMs with cau-
ing a disturbance.
market places, festivals and
tion—your back is to
sell you something at

crime-ridden neighborhoods.
the action on the
bargain prices.
street.
Your source: travel.state.gov
Even if you are lost, act
 Beware of groups of va-
have them handy in writ-
as if you know where you
grant children who could
ten form so that you can
are going. Ask for direc-
create a distraction to
signal your need for po-
tions only from individu-
pick your pocket.
lice or medical help.
als in authority.


Wear the shoulder strap
Put your backpack on
 Keep your cell phone
of your bag across your
your front, arms through
charged and enter the
chest and walk with the
straps and clasped in f
emergency num-
bag away from the curb
Even they let every member
bers:police, fire, your
know when trouble is near. Be
to avoid drive-by purse-
alert.
hotel, and the nearest
snatchers.
U.S. embassy
 Try to seem purposeful
 Learn a few phrases in
when you move about.
the local language or


Graduating Globally confident scientists and engineers
F O R C S M S T U D E N T S A N D F A C U L T Y T R A V E L I N G O V E R S E A S
Office of International
Programs
Safety in Your Hotel
1706 Illinois St.

 Keep your hotel door locked at all times. Meet visitors in the lobby.
Phone: 303 384-2120
Fax: 303 384-2125
 Do not leave money and other valuables in your hotel room while you are out. Use the hotel
E-mail: kgengenb@mines.edu
safe.
 If you are out late at night, let someone know when you expect to return.
 If you are alone, do not get on an elevator if there is a suspicious-looking person inside.
 Read the fire safety instructions in your hotel room. Know how to report a fire, and be sure
you know where the nearest fire exits and alternate exits are located. (Count the doors be-
tween your room and the nearest exit; this could be a lifesaver if you have to crawl through a
smoke-filled corridor.)
Learn more
on the web at: http://oip.mines.edu/

Other Countries take Drugs
very seriously.
You could go to jail!
Faculty and Students
You could be sent home by
the group leaders.
You could be put to death
for possession.
Faculty are responsible for the safety and well-being of their students while on state authorized
You could go to jail for
travel. Students are responsible for their behavior and participation as would be expected in
simply bringing illegal
an on-campus program or activity.
drugs into the country!
Responsibilities include, but are not limited to:
YOU can be caught!

Students providing information in a timely manner on where they are going (if not accompanied
Your embassy is not much by a faculty member) and when they expect to return. They must provide a local contact num-
help.
ber to the Faculty in charge.
Medical marijuana is not
legal internationally!
Faculty and students acting in a professional manner that reflects positively for the Colorado
School of Mines and the United States.
A “Lead Student” should be identified and provided with the emergency numbers and instruc-
tions on how to contact CSM in the event that a faculty member is incapacitated.
Faculty and students are expected to be cognizant of local customs and law and avoid actions
that are illegal, improper or indiscreet.
Faculty have the right and the authority to send a student home if he or she is not meeting the
safety and programmatic goals of the program. The cost of an accompanying escort, if neces-
sary, may be passed on to the student.
Faculty are expected to notify the Colorado School of Mines emergency response team as soon
as is practical after assuring the safety of all students